cankerbloxxom

Ask me anything   Chrissy. CBR.
Have brain, will travel.

sophieblackhallcain:

Here’s a piece I did for Painted Prose, an exhibition at Substation no. 4 on Petrie Terrace in Brisbane! 

sophieblackhallcain:

Here’s a piece I did for Painted Prose, an exhibition at Substation no. 4 on Petrie Terrace in Brisbane! 

— 1 day ago with 57 notes
#omg  #beautiful 
worldpaintings:

Edvard Munch The Brooch (Eva Mudocci with a Brooch), 1903, lithograph on very thin Japan paper, The Munch Museum, Oslo.
Eva Mudocci (1872-1952), real name Evangeline Hope Muddock, was a British violinist and pianist. A child prodigy, she started to play music under the name Rose Lynton and changed it later to the Italian-sounding Eva Mudocci when she began to travel Europe. In 1903 Moducci settled in Paris with her partner, the musician Bella Edwards. That very year she met Edvard Munch. Their affair continued on/off until 1909. 
"He wanted to make a perfect portrait of me but each time he began on an oil painting he destroyed it, because he was not happy with it. He had more success with the lithographs, and the stones that he used were sent up to our room in the Sans Souci Hotel in Berlin accompanied by a note that said: "Here is the stone that fell from my heart." - Eva Moducci 

worldpaintings:

Edvard Munch

The Brooch (Eva Mudocci with a Brooch), 1903, lithograph on very thin Japan paper, The Munch Museum, Oslo.

Eva Mudocci (1872-1952), real name Evangeline Hope Muddock, was a British violinist and pianist. A child prodigy, she started to play music under the name Rose Lynton and changed it later to the Italian-sounding Eva Mudocci when she began to travel Europe. 
In 1903 
Moducci settled in Paris with her partner, the musician Bella Edwards. That very year she met Edvard Munch. Their affair continued on/off until 1909. 

"He wanted to make a perfect portrait of me but each time he began on an oil painting he destroyed it, because he was not happy with it. He had more success with the lithographs, and the stones that he used were sent up to our room in the Sans Souci Hotel in Berlin accompanied by a note that said: "Here is the stone that fell from my heart." - Eva Moducci 

— 2 days ago with 99 notes

so despite being referred for psychological treatment by my dr and having the psych assess me as depressed & anxiety disordered i never really realised what was going on. and i think today was the first time that i actually believed and realised that yes i am depressed and the reason i feel so crook all the time is because i am depressed. and it was a super weird feeling to acknowledge it. i just…. i guess i had the thing where i assumed everyone felt like this and this is just what being a grown up is like. but then i thought about how normal people probably dont spend a lot of their time worrying about the things i worry about, and probably dont dedicate that much time to thinking about how even tho the thought of dying is really scary from my current perspective it almost seems like a relief and yeah its scary to write that out and really know that sometimes that is how i feel. and its scary to realise that sometimes death looks like a relief because in some ways it feels like a bit of a slippery slope y’know. either way. it was an intense day. when i had this realisation i was at work and i was just sitting at my computer and i cried a little bit but then i had stuff to do and people were around. then i went to drinks with hannah and tried to be social and then to macarthur ave party but i dont fit in in any of those places. ughhh idk i will probably delete this in the morning. 

— 3 days ago with 6 notes
"At a Sydney art opening, Walsh was approached by a man who asked, “Aren’t you the guy who built the great art museum in Hobart?” “Nah, mate,” Walsh replied. “I sell drugs in children’s playgrounds.”"
— 5 days ago with 2 notes
thecleanerroommate asked: How do you feel about people singing along to songs at concerts? Like, besides the barn burners like "No Children" and "Death Metal Band"?


Answer:

johndarnielle:

I feel like having a blanket “it’s great!” or “it isn’t great!” about this question would be kinda weird! Like…it depends! Sometimes it’s the best, sometimes you feel like it sorta takes off in the wrong direction. I’ve had audiences sing along with “San Bernardino,” a quiet song, and have it be the best damn thing in the world (respect forever to Manchester, I think of you often and send my love), but then sometimes people are singing with a song where it just doesn’t feel like that serves the song, or shout-singing where that just sorta misses the point of a lyric…and that’s the question with any instrument / vocal part / harmony / anything at all: is this serving the song? does it make the song cooler? whether anybody ever hears it or not: does this increase the radness? when the answer’s “yes,” then it’s great. 

but it’s tricky and elusive and there’s no “this is great” or “this isn’t good” answer that serves all purposes. people who get a dour look on their faces as soon as people start singing along should check themselves! but not every song is a sing-along and some songs just work better when a band is playing and an audience is listening. and some songs are singalongs some nights and work better as music-in-silence on others. the only difficulty is I feel like some people want a yes/no on this q (“are we supposed to be singing or not?”) when actually the answer is “it depends.” because it does! if people are singing along with every song just reflexively, I feel like that’s probably uncharitable to their neighbors at the show and that we’re not really that kinda band - not every chorus is an anthem - but all that can be worked out by using the “does it serve the song?” formula. not the performer, it’s not about how I feel. it’s about whether something increases the radness. but when it’s working? and I find somebody’s eyes right at the final chorus of “Up the Wolves”? how is that anything but rad? it is rad. 

This makes me remember the first time I saw the Mountain Goats (at the Metro in Sydney in like 2007) and they played ‘No Children’ which is obviously a timeless classic. People in the crowd were singling along, and I can’t be 100% sure that this really happened because we all know human memory is incredibly unreliable, but the way I recall it is that instead of signing “I hope you die, I hope we both die” everyone sang in unison, “I hope you die, I hope we all die” and I don’t know if that happens a lot or if it’s just how it is live, but I was not expecting it and even now when I think about it I get chills down my spine. 

— 5 days ago with 298 notes
new apartment, new specs, soon new job (/temporary secondment)…. whats that thing about a break in one circuit causing a break in the rest? 

new apartment, new specs, soon new job (/temporary secondment)…. whats that thing about a break in one circuit causing a break in the rest? 

— 5 days ago with 6 notes
#gpoy  #27 yrs old and more zits than ever 

linterlunderland:

Bright Eyes- Take It Easy (Love Nothing)

Now I do as I please, and I lie through my teeth
Someone might get hurt, but it won’t be me
Should probably feel cheap, but I just feel free
And a little bit empty

No, it isn’t so hard to get close to me
There will be no arguments, we’ll always agree
And I’ll try to be kind when I ask you to leave
We’ll both take it easy

— 5 days ago with 152 notes
The Lake Griffin

wordsbeforebirds:

THIS IS IMPORTANT

Jack Waterford published this confusing editorial about how Canberra should rename Lake Burley Griffin for Bob Menzies.

for background …

in 1913, Walter and Marion Griffin’s plans for Canberra won them the commission to design the city (on mostly-undeveloped land given up by NSW which, incidentally, had been taken from the native inhabitants some years previous).

sadly, the Griffin’s design would never be fully realised, as the National Capital Empire Development Commission (NCDC, now NCA) wasn’t totally into the cost of what it had committed to. it cut sections and slowed development while, for his part, Walter Griffin grew increasingly frustrated (the integrity of his vision was pretty much being compromised). the NCDC—having decided that Walter was extravagant and petulant—became quite catty, actively barring him from making the decisions that were his legit commissioned responsibility. (for the interest of those not from Canberra, basically every problem anyone has ever had with the city comes down to elements that the Griffin’s designed, but were never created). the Griffin’s direct involvement with the development of Canberra ended before it was completed, and not on particularly good terms.

years later, Bob Menzies rode in to lick the city’s floundering development into shape and, when the lake was completed—such as it is—chose to name it ‘Lake Burley Griffin’. the tragic/hilarious joke is not that someone mistook Walter’s middle name for part of his surname, but that everybody knew he loathed the name ‘Burley’, he rarely went by it, and it’s just unrealistic to believe that it was not intended—at least by some—as a slight to him. after all, waiting until Griffin was dead so they could guarantee having the last word just sounds so like the NCA.

regardless, naming the lake for Bob Menzies is clearly a terrible idea. not just because it sounds ridiculous (try saying ‘lake’ with any variation of his names aloud), but because Waterford’s justification is the real heroism of Menzies for sitting on his hands and allowing the lake to be left unfinished (regardless of his actual intention). idk. naming a lake for the guy responsible for it being less-fully realised is ironic and confusing.

having said that, ‘Lake Burley Griffin’ is as-obviously ironic, as-obviously confusing and—as obviously—insufficient. ‘The Lake Griffin’ is a better option. a nice and posh way of acknowledging the vision of Walter and Marion Griffin, without being a dick.

BUT, SRSLY. if we are going to the trouble of renaming it, why not, ‘Lake Surly Griffin’? this option honors the Griffins AND Canberra’s number-one local pun/sports crossover, with the added benefit of being just postmodern enough to complement the architecture.

Bob’s already got a freakin’ library named after him, what more does he need? 

Also as far as naming stuff in Canberra goes, personally I’m pissed off that the only thing named after Marion Mahony Griffin is the gotdang lookout on Mt Ainslie. I mean. Seriously???? 

— 6 days ago with 5 notes
thebigsisteryouneveraskedfor:

Gisella Perl was forced to work as a doctor in Auschwitz concentration camp during the holocaust.
She was ordered to report ever pregnant women do the physician Dr. Josef Mengele, who would then use the women for cruel experiments (e.g. vivisections) before killing them.
She saved hundrets of women by performing abortions on them before their pregnancy was discovered, without having access to basic medical supplies. She became known as the “Angel of Auschwitz”.
After being rescued from Bergen-Belsen concentration camp she tried to commit suicide, but survived, recovered and kept working as a gynecologist, delivering more than 3000 babies.

thebigsisteryouneveraskedfor:

Gisella Perl was forced to work as a doctor in Auschwitz concentration camp during the holocaust.

She was ordered to report ever pregnant women do the physician Dr. Josef Mengele, who would then use the women for cruel experiments (e.g. vivisections) before killing them.

She saved hundrets of women by performing abortions on them before their pregnancy was discovered, without having access to basic medical supplies. She became known as the “Angel of Auschwitz”.

After being rescued from Bergen-Belsen concentration camp she tried to commit suicide, but survived, recovered and kept working as a gynecologist, delivering more than 3000 babies.

(via sweetjanesays)

— 6 days ago with 143809 notes

good lord

PS GUESS WHO WENT TO SEE DRACULA UNTOLD TONIGHT AHAHHAHAHHDAHDBSAKFBCAVB 

(Source: luke-evans)

— 6 days ago with 394 notes

5footabstract:

I hate that we can’t openly crave love without appearing to lack self-love. Intimacy is a necessity and no one should ever feel like they’re robbing themselves of anything by asking for someone to share that kind of love with them. You’re not weak because you want someone to look at you like you’re gold. You can look at yourself like you’re gold but I promise that the greatest thing we’ll share as humans is a connection. Connect.

yeh i dunno, you can want to connect as much as you like, but if the fish ain’t biting there’s fuck all you can do. 

(via andwhenithappens)

— 1 week ago with 12948 notes
#i mean you had me till the last two sentences